Ep #9: Dysfunctions of a Team: Lack of Accountability & Trust: Part 4

In this episode, Dr. Nick & Dr. Nicole discuss another dysfunction of a team: lack of accountability. They showcase the “love & loathe” technique that allows employees to take a closer look at their tasks as well as a “linking” exercise that allows employees to feel inspired.

“You grow a business by growing people.” - Dr. Nick

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Noteworthy Time Stamps:

4:00 True vulnerability & feedback

6:10 Self accountability

9:11 The “loathe” list

11:00 Restructuring our beliefs

14:15 Incentives & rewards

LISTEN TO THE FULL EPISODE

Dr. Nicole:
This is the Integrative Entrepreneur Podcast where it’s not what you do, but how you do it. This is a podcast for entrepreneurs brought to you by entrepreneurs. We have been building a multi-million dollar healthcare business for over 10 years, and we have weaved together some of the best information for the people that are doing the best work in the business. This includes Dr. Demartini, who is a master in human behavior to Verne Harnish, who has created the methodology of Scaling Up that has scaled many, many of the best businesses that we all know of. We want you to not only have a business that you love, but also a life that you love.

Dr. Nicole:
All right, so welcome back. We are at part four on the five dysfunctions happening in your organization. We are talking about avoidance of accountability. This is really the fourth part of building off of the crappy foundation, essentially. So we’ve been talking about how lack of vulnerability in your company, absence of trust, fear of conflict, as well as lack of commitment is really something that is going to affect your bottom line. It’s going to affect your bottom line because people are not completely committed to the projects, the marketing campaigns, the rollout, or even just how you are showing up for your clients and customers. So very often is they are not accountable. They’re not accountable to their day-to-day tasks. They’re not going to be accountable to deadlines and projects and different things that need to get done, which then is going to result in some pretty serious issues when it comes to cashflow.

Dr. Nick:
I mean, I’m going to call it out as before might get tiring, hearing this over and over and over, but it’s as above so below. And it’s always first going in, having that candid conversation with yourself, with the executive team, and saying, “Where are we not being accountable?” Because people see everything. If we, as leaders, aren’t being held accountable, aren’t holding ourselves accountable, then why should anybody else? So many times we’re slacking on something, we’re not holding ourselves accountable, but then we’re getting pissed off because our team, our tribe is not being accountable, holding themselves accountable.

So a lot of the times when we are getting triggered to say… The trigger comes from holding that resonance inside of us. If we’re judging someone, especially for being unaccountable and we’re off about it, it’s because there’s an aspect of our own life that we’re not being accountable. And that could be in business where outside of, because we carry, we’re a reflection, the business is a reflection of us. So it’s really being able to look at our entire lives and hold ourselves accountable for that. And to be able to work through the things that were not accountable first and then go into the team so we’re not emotional driven.

Dr. Nicole:
I 100% agree. From the inside of business aspect of lack of accountability is like you said, everybody sees everything. So if you have a leadership team that… What we were talking about prior is this fear of conflict, or boring meetings, and not taking feedback from the team, or not inviting feedback from the team, which then creates these other issues. But if you are kind of half asking it, if you have the leadership team that, “Okay, we’re going to be vulnerable, and we are going to invite feedback, and we are going to invite this in the meetings and we’re going to address it, and we want to make sure that everyone feels heard.” And then you do it for a week or two, and then it falls off. Or now you’re taking the feedback. It’s almost like fluff, “Oh, we want your feedback.” But you never do anything with it. You don’t even acknowledge it. That’s just as bad.

Dr. Nick:
And if you tell the team that we’re rolling this out, we’re going to do things to get more feedback and do all that? You’re not doing it. You just take action.

Dr. Nicole:
Yeah, that’s true too.

Dr. Nick:
It’s like, “We’re changing our culture.” I was like, that’s not how culture is created.

Dr. Nicole:
No, it is taking that action, but it’s being accountable to that too. We’ve definitely worked with students in IGI that have restructured meetings and said, “We would love more feedback.” But you could tell there was still a fear around it. So it was like, “We want a little bit of feedback, but we don’t really want that much feedback.” And they were just trying to stay in that comfort zone to still keep everything harmonious, because they were in this mindset that if there was conflict, then that was going to trickle and create bigger issues. The issues are there. They’re just not being talked about to you.

Dr. Nick:
True that.

Dr. Nicole:
So it’s just, don’t be ignorant to the idea that everything is harmonious if it’s not making its way into your office, because if you can sense that there is tension, or you can sense that there are things that are not working well, then chances are things are not working well. The only person to really step in and have the hard conversations and troubleshoot it is going to be you, as the CEO. That is your job. If you do have a large leadership team, directors, managers, executives, they should also be playing the same role, but at the end of the day, if something cannot be resolved it goes to the top person, who is the CEO of the company.

Dr. Nick:
Yeah. I mean, jumping and looking at deeper in this accountability, what’s most important is self-accountability. It’s holding yourself accountable for your actions. Really, when it comes to actions, actions are always in effect. So we can only control three things in life, our perceptions, our decisions, and our actions. It’s really as a leadership position to be able to teach people, because we’ve never learned these things in life. And that’s part of really a business is to grow a business and you grow a business by growing people. People are what create things so we have to create better people. A big part of that is being accountable to grow your clients, and not your clients, well, maybe your clients, but to growing your team and to grow your employees. So when we do that, that’s the accountability we have for ourself, as we have to constantly be growing ourselves so that we can give that. If we’re not holding ourselves accountable, we can’t hold anybody else accountable and we can’t grow anyone else.

So it always comes from within to external, without, and really the big process and self-accountability is going back to that value system. It’s like we all have a hierarchy of things that are least important to most important to us. We’re going to be self-accountable to things that are most important to us. We’re not going to hold ourselves accountable to things that are low productive to us, because it wastes our time and our energy, which doesn’t serve us and it doesn’t serve the business. So a big part of being a leader is with your team, getting the right people on the right seat. You may have an awesome team, but if they’re in the wrong seat, it’s going to create chaos.

Dr. Nicole:
But also in that fact is one of the exercises, the major focus at the right time when we’re working with our clients in IGI is one of the exercises that’s sometimes appropriate, depending on their pain point is the love and loathe. We’re taking them through as the CEO, but we’re also taking their employees through this exercise. Initially, CEOs get triggered about it, you can’t like everything about your position. And sometimes we have to do things that we don’t love to do. And yes, that’s a hundred percent valid, but at the same time is you want to be able to cross-reference this exercise. There are some times things that other employees love that you’re almost like, “What? You love accounting? What’s wrong with you?”

Dr. Nick:
“You like Excel sheets?”

Dr. Nicole:
Yeah, and you’re so baffled because now you have one individual that has something on their plate that they can’t stand doing, and then you have another individual that loves it. I remember, we had an employee who was working on the clinical side, but she loved HR. And we were like, “Oh, well.”, and we just had no idea that was not even something that was a discussion. But more importantly is that utilizing different tools at different times, and if there is something that’s on the loathe list that you’re like, “Well, this is actually an essential part of your position.”

Question number one is, do you have the right person in the right seat? And do we have to potentially move them to a different position? Or is it more of a linking issue? That’s really Dr. Nick’s expertise, which I’ll let him speak on behalf of, but is it a matter of, they just don’t like it because they’re not able to link it to the bigger picture, the bigger purpose, or really how it might be serving them in a way that’s off their radar.

Dr. Nick:
I could go for hours about this-

Dr. Nicole:
Well, you’re not allowed to go for hours so keep it short and sweet.

Dr. Nick:
All right. So to keep it simple, we all make decisions. Like I said before, about seeing more benefits than drawbacks and the way we perceive that is based off of our belief system. So our belief systems is we see something as being either good or bad and having more benefits or more drawbacks. And from that, animalistically, we’re always searching for pleasure and to avoid pain. That’s the foundation of how we make our decisions. When getting deeper into that, it’s about literally structuring the… It’s hard not to go really deep.

Dr. Nicole:
Go. God!

Dr. Nick:
I’m fighting. Ask me the question again so I can be more superficial.

Dr. Nicole:
What?

Dr. Nick:
This is a short, short…

Dr. Nicole:
Just circle it back to accountability.

Dr. Nick:
I’m sweating right now.

So simply put it’s the easiest way to remodel our decision-making is by changing how the brain literally perceives things. As we said, we can only control three things. We control our perceptions, control our decisions, and control our actions. From that, we can change our belief against things. I am going to go a little bit deep, but scientifically the foundation of everything comes from our beliefs, how we see things, if they’re good or they’re bad. And from those beliefs that drives and creates emotions, our motions then dictate our thoughts. What’s crazy is Neuroscience actually proved that an emotion concur up to seven seconds before we have a conscious thought. So when people tell you to control your thoughts, it’s literally almost impossible. We can decide what to do after the fact of our thoughts, but we can’t control our thoughts because they’re emotionally driven before we’re even conscious about it. And we can’t control our emotions because they’re actually derived from our beliefs.

So through linking, we can actually change our belief, so we can actually link more benefits, we can stack more benefits, and then there’s another benefit from that, and there’s another benefit from that. What that does is it actually remodels our brain to be able to have a different neural pathway. So the synapses, how everything’s literally connected together or rearrange itself based on our literally beliefs on our thought patterns. And when we restructure our beliefs, we remodel our brain to be able to actually think differently unconsciously. So we have different emotions that create different thoughts. The whole concept of linking is really that it’s a remodeling phase for our brain and for our mind.

When we do that, then we can go back and actually be more self-accountable because we’ve taken the time to change our belief against something. So what we first thought, maybe didn’t serve us. Now, through the aspect of linking, we’ve remodeled our brain to be able to create connections so that we see that it does serve us. This is one of the most powerful actions that we can take in any aspect of life to be able to start taking more action or to stop action that’s not serving us.

Dr. Nicole:
Well, one thing that I want to expand upon on what you’re saying is that the other layer here is you’re taking someone through this love and loathe, and then we have certain things that are on the loathe list that we want to make an effort to link, to provide deeper purpose, and maybe change the belief system around why we feel that that is something that we loathe doing. But another factor that I was thinking about when you were talking is there’s also this idea of reward, but not reward for an individual, but reward as a team. So it’s a little bit different when you’re the lone ranger, and you’re the only person in your department, or you’re a remote worker. That’s not necessarily working with a team and having community and collaboration, but if you are creating that type of environment, which we do highly, highly, highly recommend.

Because now, you have individuals that are able to say like, “Hey, I have so much on my plate right now, but I know that we’re really trying to get to this quarterly goal. And I know that there’s a lot riding on it because we’re going to take that trip to Puerto Rico. I know that you’re really good at this, and you might be able to get it down faster. Can you take this off my plate? And is there something that maybe you don’t really want to do that I can take off your plate and we can just do this?” We’re all working towards the common goal and working towards that reward. So I find that’s really great.

When I was going through the Scaling Up certification, I thought it was interesting about this incentivizing or creating reward, but it wasn’t to keep your people motivated. It was to really bring them together, to work together as a team, to then achieve the score. It’s like having the scoreboard of here’s your team of the quarter, here’s our specific benchmarks and goals that we want to reach. If we’re able to do this together as a team, then we really want to celebrate in this way. So I thought that was felt really good because we do want to celebrate our efforts and we want to celebrate the fact that we’re able to come together as a really strong entity and achieve those goals and it’s worth celebrating because that’s the beauty of it.

Dr. Nick:
And that’s the increases reward, increases accountability, when you do it intelligently. Going back to having that constructive feedback, conflict you could say, in meetings is that’s when you have somebody say, “This is a struggle point for me, this is a conflict, and I’m not going to be able to reach this deadline.” It’s throwing that out there, but in having those specific team meetings set up where you can have somebody else step-up, because we’re all working as a tribe together. It’s not like, “Hey, that’s not my job. This is your job. Don’t push anything else on me blah, blah, blah. It’s almost four o’clock, I’m going to be out of here in five minutes anyways.” It’s really about saying, “Oh yeah, this aspect of that? I can totally crush it for you. Actually, the rest of my weeks kind of light and this? There’ll be perfect. I’ll be able to get it done.” Then you can carry off of that. It’s a no brainer when you create an environment to grow together.

Dr. Nicole:
Yeah, and I do think that, that really does require trust and vulnerability, which is going back to the previous podcast that we did that led up to this one. But, as we continue on, we have one more that is a dysfunction of an organization and that’s inattention to results. Really, the inattention to results comes back to every single thing that we’ve talked about so far. So if you don’t have the trust, you don’t have the ability to have comfortable conflict, if you don’t have the accountability, then you are, not just your employees but you as the CEO, completely ignoring results. You’re probably not willing to look at the data and you don’t even want to look at the numbers because you’re cringing. Our next segment that we’re going to get into is really discussing inattention to results and how this is such a detriment to your business. But honestly, as a CEO or business owner, this is a detriment to your livelihood.

Dr. Nick:
And honestly your health.

Dr. Nicole:
Yeah, 100%. All right. So, tune into the next one where we finish off the five dysfunctions of an organization.

Dr. Nick:
You’ve reached the end of another episode of the Integrative Entrepreneur Podcast. Connect with us at integrativegrowthinstitute.com. Don’t forget to sign up to our newsletter to receive our free materials. See you at the next episode.

Dr. Nicole:
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